Why It’s Okay to Cry During Meditation

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Have you ever teared up or started to cry during savasana or meditation? If so, then you are not alone. It is perfectly normal to cry during meditation and it is an indication that you are getting in touch with your emotions and becoming more self-aware. 

If you’re prone to tearing up during meditation you may also have unresolved sadness, anger, or other emotions that you need to process. Meditation can provide the space and opportunity to work through and release these underlying emotions that may be keeping you stuck.

If we think of tears as the manifestation of unresolved emotions that are suppressed in our subconscious, then meditation is the tool to silence our thoughts so our feelings can surface for deeper reflection. Tears are just the byproduct of doing the deep, internal work of sorting through our emotions so we can show up more fully in life. 

Emotional Benefits of Meditation

The mental health benefits of meditation are numerous but there are physical benefits too. Meditation can help reduce anxiety, chronic pain, depression, heart disease, and high blood pressure to name a few.

The mental and emotional benefits of meditation are often why people first start meditating. Some common benefits you might experience when you start your meditation practice include the following:

  • Reduces stress
  • Controls anxiety and reduces depression
  • Promotes emotional health
  • Enhances self-awareness
  • Increases focus and concentration 
  • May help with age-related memory loss 
  • Can promote feelings of kindness
  • May boost productivity and creativity 

When to seek out help

Although most people enjoy the positive benefits of meditation, it is possible to experience some negative side-effects too. When we finally learn to empty our minds of the constant stream of distracting thoughts, some of our most buried and unresolved emotions may surface. When these emotions appear suddenly during meditation you may find yourself overwhelmed. If feelings of sadness, overwhelm, or despondency persists, seek professional help to work through these emotions in a safe and supported environment.